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William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River

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Description: William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuylkill River
Related content: Chapters (4) Images (358)

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Description: Indecent Exposures: Eadweard Muybridge’s Animal Locomotion Nudes
~In September 1886, as the Animal Locomotion proofs were being prepared, Edward Coates issued a warning to William Pepper regarding the Muybridge project: “The human figure series should I think be carefully examined...
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.77-103
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00197.004
Description: Picturing a Nation: Art and Social Change in Nineteenth-Century America
~~John Vanderlyn had the world ahead of him. It was the beginning of the nineteenth century, and the young American who was living in Paris had already won acclaim for two powerful history paintings that had proven him to be not only up-to-date in his pictorial aesthetics but also strikingly political.
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.1-53
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00093.004
Description: Thomas Eakins: The Rowing Pictures
From the beginning of Thomas Eakins’ career in the early 1870s to the present, critics and scholars have consistently remarked on the “manly” nature of the artist’s works, but never have the masculine qualities of the paintings been explained. In...
PublisherYale University Art Gallery
Related print edition pages: pp.102-123
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00169.010
Description: Thomas Eakins: Art, Medicine, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century Philadelphia
In 1893, Dr. William Williams Keen found himself in a distinguished, though presumably nerve-wracking, position. Floating on a private yacht in Long Island Sound, Keen assisted in the removal of a cancerous tumor from the mouth of Grover Cleveland. Because Cleveland was president at the time, and undoubtedly considered his condition nobody’s business but his own, Keen waited until 1917 to discuss the secret operation. In that year, he proudly wrote about the procedure in the Saturday Evening Post
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.53-85
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00168.006

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