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Sharpshooter

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Description: Sharpshooter
Related content: Chapters (3) Images (9)

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Description: Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting
Winslow Homer was a painter. He thought of himself as a painter and directed his greatest efforts toward this art form. Whether with oils or watercolors, he sought to push his painting to address large themes, and did so in a vocabulary that broke from many American traditions. As an artist devoted to the world as it is, he saw painting as an effort not only to record a particular place and time,...
PublisherBowdoin College Museum of Art
PublisherYale University Press
Related print edition pages: pp.1-68
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00225.001
Description: Picturing
In the early 1880s, the American artist Winslow Homer (1836–1910) sketched a tragic scene: a capsized boat foundering near a rocky shore lined with trees. At least one figure appears to be floating in the...
PublisherTerra Foundation for American Art
Related print edition pages: pp.10-40
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00190.001
Description: Watercolors by Winslow Homer: The Color of Light
Winslow Homer (see figure 1), who created among the most breathtaking and influential images in the history of watercolor, was, famously, a man who received almost no formal artistic education. Acknowledged even in his own day as America’s most “original” and “independent” painter in watercolors, he had an intuitive rather than a tutored relationship with this challenging yet flexible medium. Between 1873 and 1905, he created nearly 700 watercolors. A staple of his livelihood, these works were …
PublisherArt Institute of Chicago
Related print edition pages: pp.18-34
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00173.006

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