Save
Save chapter to my Bookmarks
Cite
Cite this chapter
Print this chapter
Share
Share a link to this chapter
Free
Description: Inventing the Modern Artist: Art and Culture in Gilded Age America
Over the course of several years spent researching and writing this book, it has been my good fortune to have strong intellectual, moral, and practical support from many colleagues and friends. For their vital assistance in locating hard-to-find paintings and illustrations, I thank Lynn Corbett and Vicky A. Clark, The Carnegie Museum of Art; Catherine Gordon and Colum Hourihane, Witt Library; Susan Marcotte, Archives of American Art; Mary Holahan, Delaware Art Museum; Elizabeth Broun, National …
PublisherYale University Press
https://doi.org/10.37862/aaeportal.00068.002
Acknowledgments
Over the course of several years spent researching and writing this book, it has been my good fortune to have strong intellectual, moral, and practical support from many colleagues and friends. For their vital assistance in locating hard-to-find paintings and illustrations, I thank Lynn Corbett and Vicky A. Clark, The Carnegie Museum of Art; Catherine Gordon and Colum Hourihane, Witt Library; Susan Marcotte, Archives of American Art; Mary Holahan, Delaware Art Museum; Elizabeth Broun, National Museum of American Art; and Sarah J. Moore. Abigail B. Gerdts read a draft of the chapter on Winslow Homer and generously volunteered important information. Erica Hirshler, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, graciously shared research and ideas on Edward W. Hooper. I also thank the staffs of the Boston Athenaeum; Massachusetts Historical Society; Houghton Library, Harvard University; the Harvard Archives; and the Boston branch of the Archives of American Art. For reliable cooperation and consistently excellent work, I am grateful to the office of Photographic Services, Indiana University. A year’s sabbatical leave granted by Indiana University provided me with much-needed time for writing. To Terri Sabatos, who as my research assistant tracked down innumerable niggling details, I owe a special debt of gratitude for her efficient and energetic sleuthing. Heidi Downey at Yale University Press edited the manuscript with a sharp eye and a deft hand.
When the work was in progress, a number of colleagues provided important opportunities to try out versions of the material in public—in print or “on stage.” I thank Katherine Manthorne, Cécile Whiting, Elizabeth Johns, Marianne Doezema, Barbara Groseclose, Erika Doss, Eric Rosenberg, and Gloria Fitzgibbon; also Tamar Garb, Jane Van Norman Turano, and Jayne Kuchna. I am most grateful to David C. Miller for his invaluable criticism and support of my ideas about late nineteenth-century studios and their meanings. David Tatham, Neil Harris, and Roger Stein were also helpful at an early stage of the project. I thank Bryan J. Wolf for his illuminating and thoughtful reading of the manuscript, and Judy Metro at Yale University Press for her consistent enthusiasm, engagement, and encouragement, which have been fundamental to the development and completion of this book. Finally, I owe a special thanks to the comrades-in-arms whose long-sustained interest, good humor, and friendship never failed to charge my batteries and keep me on track, especially Michèle Bogart, Vivien Fryd, Karal Ann Marling, and Angela Miller.
Acknowledgments
Previous chapter